Sunday, June 13, 2010

Puente de Malagonlong [Sunday Bridges]

One of the few surviving arch-type stone bridges in the Philippines that was built during the Spanish regime is Malagonlong Bridge or Puente de Malagonlong. A declared historical site by the National Historical Institute, Malagonlong is a 445-foot long bridge built in 1840-1850. This was the longest bridge ever constructed during the Spanish era with approximately 100,000 adobe blocks used. Located in Tayabas, a town in Quezon province 3 hours south of Manila, Malagonlong Bridge crosses the Dumaca-a River and connects Tayabas to towns of Mauban and Pagbilao.

When I took this photo last year, motor vehicles were no longer allowed to pass this 160-year old bridge for safety reasons.
A modern girder type bridge was constructed about a 100 yards from this charming stone bridge.


Posted for Sunday Bridges

15 comments:

Photo Cache said...

so it's solely a pedestrian bridge now, how cool.

Marites said...

it's a good thing that they have stopped vehicles using this. It's really good to know and see that it's still standing there after all these years.

cieldequimper said...

I'm glad it survived, it's beautiful!

Louis la Vache said...

Excellent! Interesting history.

EG Wow said...

It's a very pretty bridge. I guess being only for pedestrians it might last a lot longer than it might have otherwise.

Lily Hydrangea said...

A very beautiful bridge indeed. I love all the greenery surrounding it.

Mo said...

Wonderful history associated with this bridge. Lovely place to rest and take pictures.

Tracy said...

A very beautiful bridge. I love the arches.

Halcyon said...

this is a lovely bridge!

Luckaa said...

Very nice scenic. Like it.

Dave said...

another history preserved.

bertN said...

I've seen pontoon bridges still in use but I've never seen a concrete bridge in Pinas that dates back to the Spanish Era. I wonder how many of them are still around?

Maya said...

When I first looked at your picture the first thing that crossed my mind was that it looked like a bridge in Spain. I had to chuckle when I read the history behind the bridge.

Maya said...

When I first looked at your picture the first thing that crossed my mind was that it looked like a bridge in Spain. I had to chuckle when I read the history behind the bridge.

Rob said...

I hope it still is used by bicycles and pedestrians.